What Can President Trump Do For Legalized Pot?

What Can President Trump Do For Legalized Pot?

Today we have a new President-elect. There are many things that Mr. Trump has promised, but little talk has been around the legalization of recreational and/or medical marijuana. While he has said in interviews that he would support the Federal rulings on the drug, he is also in favor of state's rights. So... which is it? What does he support? Can we expect a surge in pot-friendly states under a Trump administration.

New State Legalizations

Nevada, California, Florida, and Massachusetts are just a few of the states that legalized pot in some form or another last night. The vote in main is still contested as of this writing, so only time will tell if the state will be in favor of pot legalization. Regardless, 20% of Americans live in a state with legalized recreational marijuana - and even more in states with legalized medical marijuana.

Could The New Administration Hurt This Effort?

Mr. Trump is backed by smart politicians and former police officials, such as Governor Chris Christie and former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Both are seen to have a tough stance about the legalization of recreational marijuana. And that's fine. It's not likely that the Fed's will change their mind anytime soon about the Federal legalization of pot. And, many Americans agree that it should be left up to state's rights as to whether or not it it legalized in certain areas. So while as of this morning it has been voted legal to possess and smoke medical and recreational marijuana in California, it isn't so in Alabama. And many who live in Alabama are fine with that.

Obama's Current Standings

While President Obama and Mr. Trump may not see eye-to-eye on most everything, they both abide by the state's right to choose their pot legalization. In 2013, President Obama and his state department adopted the Cole Memo, which offered that states control their pot issues. Yup - states, and not the Fed's. And that's a-okay with most of us. Another thing that isn't widely known is that Colorado and Washington State's legalized pot laws has been on hold until they were given clearance by the same state department. Basically, the same thing can - and probably will - happen a Trump administration.

Will Anything Change?

So, will anything change in our quest to legalize pot at a state level? Probably not, since Mr. Trump is all for state's rights, and the current Cole Memo model is working just fine. However, many states may never legalize pot, thanks to their state's I&R rulings, which require a state house vote to further the bill onto the ballot. And let's face it: That's probably not going to happen in conservative states like Alabama and Georgia. But the good news is that those who can legally light up can do so without fear.